Annual Vines in the Landscape


Annual Vines in the Landscape

NEBLINE Newsletter Article by Mary Jane Frogge, Extension Associate
Morning Glory

Morning Glory

Nasturtiums

Trailing Nasturtiums

Scarlet Runner Bean

Scarlet Runner Bean

Sweet Pea

Sweet Pea

Gourds

Gourds

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Annual flowering vines are useful for many locations around the home landscape. They add new interest to the yard area when grown on a fence, lattice, arbor or trellis. Annual vines climb by twining around a support or by clinging with tendrils. They grow rapidly to form an attractive mass of foliage and flowers.

Morning glory is one of the most colorful vines you can plant. Brilliant flowers are available in white and shades of blue, pink, purple and red. The flowers are four inches across and are borne freely on vines which may grow to a height of 12 to 15 feet tall. Morning glories grow best on a well-drained soil in a warm, sunny location.

Trailing nasturtiums grow four or five feet tall. They bloom profusely and producing fragrant flowers in shades of red and yellow. The plants perform best in well drained soil and full sun.

Scarlet runner bean is an edible ornamental suitable for trellising. Rosy scarlet flowers top long twining vines. The pods are very ornamental.

The sweet pea has a delicate, colorful flower that has a honey-orange blossom scent. These vines will grow 6 to 8 feet tall in full sun.

Cardinal climber is a lovely flowering vine. It has dark green, palm-like leaves and bright crimson red flowers.

Gourds have rather inconspicuous flowers, but produce colorful fruit which are ornamental on the vine during late summer. The fruit may be dried for fall and winter arrangements.

Photo Credits:

  • Morning Glory: Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database
  • Trailing Nasturtiums: Hugh Wilson -TAMU Herbarium, Texas A&M University
  • Sweet Pea: Hugh Wilson -TAMU Herbarium, Texas A&M University
  • Scarlet Runner Bean: Charles Cazabon
  • Gourd: Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

(This resource appeared in the May 2005 NEBLINE Newsletter. For information on reproducing this information or using any photographs or graphics, read the Terms of Use statement)

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