Cooperative Extension in Lancaster County
444 Cherrycreek Road, Lincoln, Nebraska. Phone: 402-441-7180. University of Nebraska-Lincoln
 

 

DID YOU GUESS IT??

Caraway Seeds Infested by Pantry Pests

Caraway seeds infested by beetles Discovering “bugs” in your spices may be disgusting, but it isn’t unusual, because many insects like to eat what we do. Stored foods commonly infested include flour, cereals, cracked grains, baking mixes and processed foods, crackers, macaroni, cured meats, powdered milk, dried fruits, nuts, popcorn and spices.

Insects that feed on these products may also infest other grain-based items such as pet foods, birdseed and ornamental corn.

Do not use insecticides for controlling these or other insects in pantry areas. Washing shelves with detergent, bleach, ammonia or disinfectants will not have any effect on these pests since these insects lay their eggs on suitable food.

Removing infested items and thoroughly cleaning with a vacuum is usually sufficient. As a precaution against reinfestation, store susceptible foods in tightly sealed glass, metal or heavy plastic containers or in the refrigerator or freezer.

If insects continue to appear, go through stored items again, also check other rooms in the home for possible sources. Tree seeds blown into ventilators or around windows may harbor these pests. Dermestids (carpet beetles) can develop in many products such as feathers, silk, wool, fur, stuffed animal skins, dead insects, lint and many other materials. If insect problems persist, seek assistance from a pest control professional.

For more information, read Managing Pantry Pests


Can You Guess It??This Can You Guess It?? photo appears in the February 2005 Nebline Newsletter. Find the answer here

Did you miss a Can You Guess It?? Find past photos and resources here.


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